“I’ve always loved the idea of not being what people expect me to be.”
— Dita Von Teese (via priscellastef)

(via innatelymagical)

deadlybearhug:

tatiana maslany receiving clone nesting dolls from a fan @ SDCC 2014

please do not remove credit/repost and you can find more photos soon here

jimmydanzig:

"I know what you do in that room!!"

newyorker:

A Western is identifiable by people on horseback in the West, and a musical involves singing and dancing. But what characterizes film noir? Richard Brody on the elusive genre: http://nyr.kr/1A6z3wz

“The term ‘film noir’ has come down to us as a product of a subordinate strain of French criticism, different from the one that came to dominate cinematic discourse with the concept of auteurism, as well as to dominate filmmaking itself through the innovations of the New Wave. It had no currency among Hollywood filmmakers of the forties and fifties, for the simple reason that French criticism over-all had little influence in the U.S. until the rise of the New Wave.”

Above: “The Maltese Falcon”

Whenever I eat watermelon with silverware I feel…wicked

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

Joseph Sterling’s “Age of Adolescence”

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.